Last edited by Jur
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

10 edition of The Origins of Reasonable Doubt found in the catalog.

The Origins of Reasonable Doubt

Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial

by James Q. Whitman

  • 378 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Criminal law,
  • Foundations of law,
  • History Of Civilization And Culture (General),
  • Law,
  • Legal Reference / Law Profession,
  • Criminal Law - General,
  • General,
  • Law / General,
  • Europe - General,
  • Legal History,
  • Burden of proof,
  • Europe,
  • Evidence, Criminal,
  • History,
  • Judgments, Criminal,
  • Moral and ethical aspects

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages288
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10319301M
    ISBN 100300116004
    ISBN 109780300116007

    To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt." But what is reasonable doubt? Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of "reasonable doubt." It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological one.

    Davis tells Mitch that there's now a third option available, one that can help them both get off. He suggests that if another murder with the same M.O. as the others were to occur while Mitch was in custody, then that would take the focus off of him, at the very least creating reasonable doubt . The Origins of Reasonable Doubt的书评 (全部 2 条) 热门 / 最新 / 好友 海德格尔 中国政法大学出版社版.

      - Buy The Origins of Reasonable Doubt – Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) book online at best prices in India on Read The Origins of Reasonable Doubt – Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) book reviews & author details and more at . ♥ Book Title: The Origins of Reasonable Doubt ♣ Name Author: James Q. Whitman ∞ Launching: Info ISBN Link: ⊗ Detail ISBN code: ⊕ Number Pages: Total sheet ♮ News id: 3gwVwl04y7MC Download File Start Reading ☯ Full Synopsis: "To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.”.


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The Origins of Reasonable Doubt by James Q. Whitman Download PDF EPUB FB2

My new book, The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial, uses history to account for this troubling state of affairs. In order to make sense of our law, we have to. : The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) (): Whitman, James Q.: BooksCited by: My new book, The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial, uses history to account for this troubling state of affairs.

In order to make sense of our law, we have to dig deep into its past. The reasonable doubt formula seems mystifying.

The Origins of Reasonable Doubt book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a p 4/5. "Whitman's argument in The Origins of Reasonable Doubt relies on detailed research, but what makes the book fascinating is that its historical thesis goes beyond the facts to produce a bold imaginative reconstruction of intellectual causes and effects This exciting volume demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that the history of law is too important and too interesting to remain the.

The Origins of Reasonable Doubt by James Q. Whitman,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(20). In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of reasonable doubt.” It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological one.

To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” But what is reasonable doubt.

Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight. "Whitman's argument in The Origins of Reasonable Doubt relies on detailed research, but what makes the book fascinating is that its historical thesis goes beyond the facts to produce a bold imaginative reconstruction of intellectual causes and effects This exciting volume demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that the history of law is too important and too interesting to remain the.

The origins of “reasonable doubt” lie in a forgotten world of pre-modern Christian theology, a world whose concerns were quite different from our own. At its origins, as this Article aims to show, the familiar “reasonable doubt” rule. The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial: Whitman, Ford Foundation Professor of Comparative and Foreign Law James Q: : Libros/5(5).

“A reasonable doubt” is the third installment in the “Robin Lockwood” series and although it can be read as a stand-alone I pretty much recommend reading first the previous novels if only to learn about these characters’ stories from the beginning. Of all the three books in the series, “A reasonable doubt /5.

"Whitman's argument in The Origins of Reasonable Doubt relies on deatiled research, but what makes the book fascinating is that its historical thesis goes beyond the facts to produce a bold imaginative reconstruction of intellectual causes and effects This exciting volume demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that the history of law is too important and too interesting to remain the.

The "reasonable doubt" rule is notoriously difficult to define, and many judges and scholars have deplored the confusion it creates in the minds of jurors.

Yet "reasonable doubt" is regarded as a fundamental part of our law. How can a rule of such fundamental importance be so difficult to define and understand.

The answer, this paper tries to show, lies in history. A new book by James Whitman, professor of criminal law and legal history at Yale Law School, explains the origins of that English Common Law eccentricity of finding a defendant guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt.” The reasonable doubt test arose from theological, not legal, concerns.

As Whitman said in the History News Network article (linked above). [] The Origins of Reasonable Doubt Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference), this is a great books that I think.

To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Beyond a reasonable doubt is a legal standard of proof required to validate a criminal conviction in most adversarial legal systems. It is a higher standard of proof than the balance of probabilities (commonly used in civil matters) and is usually therefore reserved for criminal matters where what is at stake (e.g.

someone's liberty) is considered more serious and therefore deserving of a. In this accessible book, James Q.

Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of “reasonable doubt.” It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological : $ high legal standard of proof. In The Origins of Reasonable Doubt, author James Whitman, a lawyer and historian, upends what we think we know about the “reasonable doubt” standard by taking readers on a historical journey to its origins.

Strikingly,Whitman locates those origins before the very birth of modern law—in Christian moral theology. The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial by James Q. Whitman available in Hardcover onalso read synopsis and reviews.

To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty "beyond a reasonable Author: James Q. Whitman. Reasonable Doubt and the History of the Criminal Trial Thomas P Gallanist The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial, James Q.

Whitman. Yale, Pp ix, INTRODUCTION On July 7,a young man named Richard Corbett stood in London's main criminal court, the Old Bailey He was not there as a. This is a substantial review of James Whitman's book on "The Origins of Reasonable Doubt: Theological Roots of the Criminal Trial" (Yale University Press ).

The review proceeds in three main parts. Part I outlines the book's argument. Part II highlights four significant aspects of the book meriting high accolades.To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt.” But what is reasonable doubt?

Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight.